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20131130_094654sI wonder who named this plant; am curious since the plant is nothing like its names suggest.

The Rondeletia odorata or Fragrant Rondeletia, also known as the Panama Rose is definitely not scented and the flower does not bear any resemblance to a rose.

20131130_094654closeBut I’m not complaining. Its yellow-centred orange flowers may be small but they are bright and vivid. The fact that they come in clusters make them even more eye-catching.

When I first saw the Rondeletia odorata I thought it was a variant of the lantana. But it wasn’t.

I have never come across the plant before, but the lady at the garden centre assured me that it’s local. I wonder if that’s really so – Wiki says it’s native to Cuba and Panama. But why waste time splitting hairs. All that matters is that one has found its way to my garden!   ;)

IMG_9218szApparently the Rondeletia odorata can grow up to 10 feet tall; a little hard to believe when I look at the small potted specimens and their even tinier blooms.

But this diminutive beauty came with a big price. Should I or should I not? I debated for no more than 10 minutes before making the obvious decision.

Any regrets? Not at all; especially when the buds burst into clusters of vibrant candy coloured hues. They may not be edible, but they sure look a treat!

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Care and propagation : Full sun; garden soil, water moderately; propagate using semi-hard wood cuttings (will be a while before I get to try this)

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20130930_180811sI rarely buy a plant for its foliage, so it was quite out of character for me to get this.

The gardenia is known for its lovely waxy, ivory blooms and the Gardenia Jasminoides Variegata is no different.

Yet it was the green and ivory variegated leaves that caught my eye first; a gorgeous blend of greens and ivory; each leaf a unique monochromatic artwork.

Surprisingly, the plant was inexpensive.

The Gardenia Jasminoides Variegata has great potential as a focal plant, so I removed a waterlily tub in the centre of the garden and planted the gardenia in its place.

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20131003_072412sThe gardenia grew for close to half a year before anything happened. In fact, I didn’t even know that the gardenia was budding and almost missed its first bloom until I saw a flash of white amidst the leaves.

And then I noticed swirls of buds; much like the top of a Cornetto ice cream. And like the ice cream, it was irresistible. I took multiple photos of the buds – I just couldn’t get enough of its unique swirls

If anyone asked me which has the x-factor, I’d say it’s a close fight between the variegated leaf and the bud.

But what about the flower? … I think in this case, it may just be a little outclassed.

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Care and propagation – full sun; garden soil; water generously. Propagate using cuttings.

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We never planted the cucumber, but there it was, in a bed covered with stones and pebbles.

20130925_181639sWe thought it wouldn’t survive, but it did. The gangly thing grew stronger and then surprise, surprise … it flowered!

The flowers were spots of sunshine in the otherwise colorless corner. Pretty, yes. But productive? Mmmm …20130921_133254s

What doubting Thomases we were. We didn’t expect the gangly vine to produce anything for the dining table.

But it did and proved us more than once.

The unassuming vine yielded cucumbers for salad and stir fries. And when we let the last cucumber age, we even had a lovely golden hued cucumber for soup.

It’s amazing how quickly the cucumber grows.

A tiny one-inch cucumber could grow to its full length within four to five days. Even the aged old cucumber didn’t take very long.

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The vine was short lived and expired soon after we harvested the last old cucumber.

But I’ve a hunch that that cucumber plant is the precursor of many more to come.

Care and propagation: full sun, garden loam or compost soil, water generously; propagate using seeds.

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Fuchsia

IMG_0778sI have two grouses about one of the world’s most beautiful and popular plants. One, I always stumble over its spelling, and two, they always die on me.

The fuchsia and I have had several fleeting acquaintances in the past. I’ve always hoped that the fuchsia would take up permanent residency in our garden, but this wishful thinking never came to pass.

IMG_9074sMaybe I should be realistic and grow things with a better chance of survival in hot and humid conditions. But, that’s not me; I’m a glutton for punishment.

I bought yet another two fuchsias a couple of months ago. Why? There’s something about the fuchsia’s skirts, frills and flounces that I can’t resist.

But just which fuchsias did I get? I googled to check and saw an amazing line up of ballerinas, can-can and flamenco dancers. The myriad of pendulous forms and colours had me in a tizzy.  I couldn’t find the proper names for them, but no matter – as long as they survived.

I was advised to water the fuchsias well and to give them good air-circulation. Apparently these pernickety plants do not like wet feet; nor do they like the media to dry out.

For the moment, they are still alive; but for how long?

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These past few days have been real scorchers, so things don’t look too rosy for my friends. I wonder if they have what it takes to pull through this acid test. I sure hope so.

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Care and propagation: shade to bright light away from intense heat; compost; water generously; propagate using cuttings or seeds

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IMG_4978_sCoreopsis, helianthus, melampodium … surely there’s more than enough yellow daisy-like flowers in the garden?

But noooo …. Someone’s hand still itched to get another.

Unfortunately, the first Euryops chrysanthemoides I saw was not for sale; it was part of a floral display at a floral festival.

The next time I saw the plant, I bought it faster than you could say Jack Robinson. Never mind that the plant was just a puny three inches tall.

But as with many of my first experiments, it expired all too soon.

And so I looked for it again.

I found the next Euryops chrysanthemoides at the Melbourne Botanical Gardens.

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These were almost as tall as I was, and were about 10 feet wide! I had to touch it to make sure it was for real and was the same plant.

All this while I had thought that the Euryops chrysanthemoides was a small bedding plant. But what I saw in Melbourne showed me that it was anything but tiny. Silly me; its common name ‘African Bush Daisy’ should have given me a clue.

The amazing specimen served as an excellent backdrop for my picnic and strengthened my resolve to get a replacement.

IMG_4979_ssThen just a few months ago, I found my pot of gold!

It’s progress? … so far, so good.

And if anyone’s wondering, it’s still under 10 inches tall; a far cry from its gargantuan cousin Down Under.

I doubt if my little one will ever reach those incredible dimensions, but honestly, I’m quite contented with its diminutive height.

Care and propagation: Full sun; well-drained soil; water generously. Propagate using seeds or cuttings.

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ImageIt’s supposed to be an honour to have a plant named after you. But what if the plant was the Sansevieria; commonly known as Mother-in-law’s Tongue?

The poor lady couldn’t have been amused especially since the plant’s hard sheaths have sharp pointed ends.

We had a huge clump of Sansevieria Trifasciata which had to be removed when we shifted the driveway. No one shed a tear.

Then many years later, someone gave me the tough rod-like Sansevieria Cylindrical. I thought the rods looked lethal and that someone could end up being impaled, so these too were duly removed. Once again there were no regrets.

IMG_7346Then the office next door caught fire. The quality of the air was badly compromised and we were desperate for an air purifier. I googled for answers and discovered just how amazing the Sanseviera really was.

NASA, apparently, revealed that the Sansevieria has the ability to absorb 107 unknown air pollutants including carbon monoxide and nitrogen monoxide (source: http://1st-ecofriendlyplanet.com/12/sansevieria/). Now, that really grabbed my attention.

That day, the scorned became the savior.

 

Two big pots of Sansevieria Trifasciata were wheeled into the office in an attempt to rid the air of some toxins.

At home, I started collecting the Sansevieria in earnest.  The S. Trifasciata Hahnii, S. Futura Superba  and S. Golden Hahnii Bonsai came hot on the heels of the Sansevieria Trifasciata.

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Each were placed in small pots for easy handling.And so when the haze came and facemasks flew off the shelves and everyone clambered to buy air purifiers, I turned to my collection of Sansevierias.

My sister who was visiting thought the tray of assorted Sansevieria looked lovely.

Granted that the varieties we see now are more appealing in form and colour than what we had a few decades ago, who would have thought that could be said the Mother-in-law’s Tongue?

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Care and propagation: shade to full sun; garden soil; water moderately; propagate by division

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IMG_6198sI was still in school when Dad’s friend gave him our first lot of asparagus plants. They grew well. But dad over-harvested and the poor plants met their maker.

I’ve always wanted an opportunity to try again but where we live, the asparagus isn’t a common garden vegetable, and I couldn’t find any at the garden centres.

Just as well, I guess. This gave me time to reassess our asparagus planting and harvesting techniques which were obviously flawed.

IMG_5849esMy second chance came a couple of years back. These plants were started from seed (not that I can take any credit for that) – they were a birthday present from a friend. They were also the most delicate things I had ever seen.

The seedlings took a while to settle in, but once they stabilized, their growth rate picked up. I love every stage of its growth.

First, a promising stout spear pushes its way out of the soil. This spear, like a gangly adolescent, grows very quickly; more than a couple of centimetres every day. It shoots skyward, branching into numerous slender arrows.

IMG_5533ebFinally, it metamorphoses into an ethereal mist of the softest, most delicate ferns.

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My asparagus has been bearing tiny flowers but apparently there are both male and female forms. And since it takes two to tango, I wonder when I’ll ever get to see the berries.

So far, the asparagus has been growing for more than a year without incident.

Then, about a couple of months ago, an errant spear pushed its way through a pot I’d placed nearby. I tried to slide the spear out through the bottom of the pot, but it wouldn’t budge. I tugged harder and …(horrors!) the spear came away in my hands. The errant spear ended up in our stir-fry for dinner.IMG_4455page

I was quite relieved when the next spear emerged out of harm’s way. But when I checked on the spear that evening, it had been beheaded! Dad happily declared that he had picked it. Uh-uh, surely history isn’t going to repeat itself?

Care and propagation: Partial shade to full sun; well-drained soil, water moderately. Propagate using seeds or by division.

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